Crabgrass, or digitaria sanguinalis is a problem grass that you may come across in your yard. It creates tough clusters that can swiftly take over a poorly cared for lawn. While considered a weed today, crabgrass was originally brought to the Americas from Europe by settlers because it served as a high protein grain that could be harvested throughout the summer without requiring much care. Even today it will often be planted in pastures for grass fed cattle, because it can serve as nutritious feed while requiring little or no intervention by the farmer.

 

Crabgrass is a hardy plant that resists a number of different chemical treatments. It can easily invade your yard if your lawn has patchy or weak growth. It also requires little water, so unusually hot and dry summers will allow crabgrass to run rampant. Crabgrass is a symptom of an unhealthy yard, not a cause itself. This means that the easiest way to prevent crabgrass is to keep your yard healthy in the first place. A strong environmental competition will keep crabgrass at bay with regular care, particularly a good watering plan.

 

If crabgrass has already taken hold in your yard, you can still retake ground from it with patience. When removing crabgrass, for a small patch pulling by hand is the most effective method, though with a particularly widespread outbreak, a lawnmower set with a low blade can be a great start, then removed the plants by the roots using either a loop or weeding hoe. Either way, make sure to immediately remove the plant remnants because it seeds throughout the summer. Once done, power rake your sod to allow for new grass seed to get a strong grip when planted. Lay out compost and seed to ensure a thick growth. Again, a healthy strong lawn is the best preventative for crabgrass. It cannot grow in the presence of thicker grasses because crabgrass doesn’t thrive in shady conditions.

 

There are some chemical treatments that work for crabgrass, but they require care and planning. Several other grasses such as dallisgrass and carpetgrass will look similar to crabgrass but will respond differently to chemical treatments, so you want to be sure of what you’re dealing with before proceeding with any chemical treatment plan. Also, what stage of growth comes into crucial play because pre-emergence and post-emergence stage crabgrass requires different treatment options. Pre-emergence treatment in particular can be highly effective in preventing crabgrass from taking hold in your lawn. Crabgrass begins to germinate when your soil reaches 55-60 degrees fahrenheit, so early summer growth can be an excellent guideline on application. You usually want to apply this treatment around the time of your second mowing of the season.

 

With all of these factors, it’s important to bear in mind that reaching out to experts can be a crucial help in addressing your lawn care issues. Remember that crabgrass growth is often a symptom of lawn issues, not the cause. You might be able to address some small crabgrass growth, but especially if you have a large outbreak, there may be bigger issues that need addressing. Call our specialists to provide an evaluation and create a comprehensive treatment plan.

Crabgrass, or digitaria sanguinalis is a problem grass that you may come across in your yard. It creates tough clusters that can swiftly take over a poorly cared for lawn. While considered a weed today, crabgrass was originally brought to the Americas from Europe by settlers because it served as a high protein grain that could be harvested throughout the summer without requiring much care. Even today it will often be planted in pastures for grass fed cattle, because it can serve as nutritious feed while requiring little or no intervention by the farmer.

 

Crabgrass is a hardy plant that resists a number of different chemical treatments. It can easily invade your yard if your lawn has patchy or weak growth. It also requires little water, so unusually hot and dry summers will allow crabgrass to run rampant. Crabgrass is a symptom of an unhealthy yard, not a cause itself. This means that the easiest way to prevent crabgrass is to keep your yard healthy in the first place. A strong environmental competition will keep crabgrass at bay with regular care, particularly a good watering plan.

 

If crabgrass has already taken hold in your yard, you can still retake ground from it with patience. When removing crabgrass, for a small patch pulling by hand is the most effective method, though with a particularly widespread outbreak, a lawnmower set with a low blade can be a great start, then removed the plants by the roots using either a loop or weeding hoe. Either way, make sure to immediately remove the plant remnants because it seeds throughout the summer. Once done, power rake your sod to allow for new grass seed to get a strong grip when planted. Lay out compost and seed to ensure a thick growth. Again, a healthy strong lawn is the best preventative for crabgrass. It cannot grow in the presence of thicker grasses because crabgrass doesn’t thrive in shady conditions.

 

There are some chemical treatments that work for crabgrass, but they require care and planning. Several other grasses such as dallisgrass and carpetgrass will look similar to crabgrass but will respond differently to chemical treatments, so you want to be sure of what you’re dealing with before proceeding with any chemical treatment plan. Also, what stage of growth comes into crucial play because pre-emergence and post-emergence stage crabgrass requires different treatment options. Pre-emergence treatment in particular can be highly effective in preventing crabgrass from taking hold in your lawn. Crabgrass begins to germinate when your soil reaches 55-60 degrees fahrenheit, so early summer growth can be an excellent guideline on application. You usually want to apply this treatment around the time of your second mowing of the season.

 

With all of these factors, it’s important to bear in mind that reaching out to experts can be a crucial help in addressing your lawn care issues. Remember that crabgrass growth is often a symptom of lawn issues, not the cause. You might be able to address some small crabgrass growth, but especially if you have a large outbreak, there may be bigger issues that need addressing. Call our specialists to provide an evaluation and create a comprehensive treatment plan.